May 26, 2013

Sophia, Part 1

Filed under: Church,Theology — Bob Gifford @ 8:26 pm

Does not wisdom call,
and does not understanding raise her voice?
On the heights, beside the way,
at the crossroads she takes her stand;
beside the gates in front of the town,
at the entrance of the portals she cries out:
“To you, O people, I call,
and my cry is to all that live.”

– Proverbs 8:1-4

Today is Trinity Sunday, which immediately follows Pentecost. These two Sundays force us Lutherans to consider the Holy Spirit for a spell, after which, with a sigh of relief, we place the Spirit back on the shelf for another year*. The lectionary for today included the text above. The Old Testament Sophia, the personification of divine wisdom, is traditionally understood as the second person of the Trinity: Christ, the Logos. But the wisdom texts seem to be more easily understood as the Paraclete, not the Logos. It is the Spirit that calls to us, that is calling to us all to follow God’s divine wisdom. Christ is the savior, but it is the Spirit that sanctifies us. And we cannot be sanctified without divine wisdom.

Another one of the lectionary lessons for today:

“I still have many things to say to you, but you cannot bear them now. When the Spirit of truth comes, he will guide you into all the truth; for he will not speak on his own, but will speak whatever he hears, and he will declare to you the things that are to come. He will glorify me, because he will take what is mine and declare it to you. All that the Father has is mine. For this reason I said that he will take what is mine and declare it to you.”

John 16:12-15

Jesus did not tell his followers everything, because they could not “bear them”, but these things are to be revealed by the “Spirit of truth”, which sounds suspiciously like our Sophia from the wisdom literature of the Old Testament. The message is discomfiting but clear: the New Testament does not contain all of God’s truth, so we must listen for the Spirit of truth to teach us what was kept from the earliest Christians.

What could Jesus’ followers not bear to hear, that may have been revealed to us since through the Holy Spirit?

The Bible was frequently used to defend slavery in the 19th century because it contains no prohibitions against it. The Bible exhorts masters to treat slaves fairly, but in doing so it seems to condone slavery. Still, it was Christian abolitionists claiming that justice can only mean that slaves be free. They did not have the Bible on their side, but they were listening to the voice of the Holy Spirit, the wisdom of God. Perhaps a command to abolish slavery was something Jesus’ followers could not bear to hear, but that the Holy Spirit has taught us in God’s own time.

What else? Perhaps the equality of women, including their acceptance as pastors, bishops and political leaders, is another truth the early church could not bear, but is one the Holy Spirit has guided us to. And I believe that the equality of gays, lesbians, and the transgendered is another. The Bible doesn’t support either of these ideas explicitly, and in fact seems to oppose them.** But we are learning from the Holy Spirit, Sophia, the divine wisdom, those things that the earliest followers of Christ could not bear to hear.

Insisting on the completeness of the Bible as a record of God’s instructions for all time not only ignores Jesus’ own words as recorded in the same Bible, but it silences the Holy Spirit. It ends God’s ability to continue guiding us to the divine truth. God is still speaking, and it is up to us to listen.

—————

* Kidding! But all humor has a kernel of truth inside.

** Yes, I know there are plenty of hermeneutical arguments against the anti-gay and anti-women clobber verses, which I ascribe to, but the fact remains there isn’t any explicitly positive instruction regarding women and GLBT equality in the Bible.

2 Comments

  1. I’m not sure I agree that there isn’t any explicitly positive message saying we should treat everyone equally. What’s “love your neighbor as yourself” about? You explicitly do not love someone as yourself if you consider them to beneath you in some way.

    Comment by larry p — May 27, 2013 @ 1:14 pm

  2. Yes, I absolutely agree, and that’s an example of the overarching message of Jesus’ ministry providing a context that supersedes the anti-gay and anti-women clobber verses. But while the clobber verses are very specific, Jesus’ message of love is general. I read that generality as therefore being universal, but it makes it too easy for some to carve out exceptions to Jesus’ message for gays and women based on the clobber verses. So perhaps I should have said “specific” rather than “explicit”.

    Comment by Bob Gifford — May 27, 2013 @ 2:10 pm

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